Monocot and dicot

In monocots the hypophyll tends to be the dominant part in contrast to other angiosperms.

Monocot and dicot root system

In addition to roots, monocots develop runners and rhizomes , which are creeping shoots. Examples include daisies, mint, pea, tamarind, and mango. Such optical signalling is usually a function of the tepal whorls but may also be provided by semaphylls other structures such as filaments , staminodes or stylodia which have become modified to attract pollinators. Bulliform cells Bulliform cells help regulate water loss. There are few though essential features due to which they are named as monocots or monocotyledons. Although largely herbaceous, some arboraceous monocots reach great height, length and mass. The single cotyledon is only one of a number of modifications of the body plan of the ancestral monocotyledons, whose adaptive advantages are poorly understood, but may have been related to adaption to aquatic habitats , prior to radiation to terrestrial habitats. From these, considerable diversity arises. Root development -- In most dicots and in most seed plants the root develops from the lower end of the embryo, from a region known as the radicle. A cross-section of tradescantia monocot stalk showing scattered vascular bundles, bundle sheath, sclerenchyma and epidermis. The differences indicated are more true for monocots versus eudicots. However, intermediate forms may occur such as in Crocosmia Asparagales. These studies will be helpful to know about the plants and their varieties in a much better way.

Monocots and dicots differ in the design of the guard cells; they are dumbbell-shaped in monocots and look like a pair of sausages in dicots. These roots may be called prop roots when they are clustered near the bottom of the stem.

Importance of monocot and dicot

Leaf veins -- In monocots, there are usually a number of major leaf veins which run parallel the length of the leaf; in dicots, there are usually numerous auxillary veins which reticulate between the major ones. As these are herbaceous as well as woody, so the stem shows secondary growth and produce woods. Anthesis the period of flower opening is usually fugacious short lived. The axis undergoes primary thickening, that progresses from internode to internode, resulting in a typical inverted conical shape of the basal primary axis see Tillich, Figure 1. They occur in multiples of three in monocots and in multiples of four or five in dicots. Some monocots can produce a substitute however, as in the palms and agaves. The vascular bundles in stems are scattered throughout, in monocots, though it is arranged in a ring-like pattern in dicots. The monocots cover approximately 60, species of the total angiosperms. They cover around , species of the total angiosperms. Rhizomes frequently have an additional storage function and rhizome producing plants are considered geophytes Tillich, Figure In these the plants rely either on chemical attraction or other structures such as coloured bracts fulfill the role of optical attraction. This feature is retained in the monocots, but most dicots are descended from a plant which developed three furrows or pores in its pollen triporate. In contrast, dicots have a taproot system , a tapering root that grows downward and has other roots sprouting laterally from it.

Nevertheless, monocots are sufficiently distinctive that there has rarely been disagreement as to membership of this group, despite considerable diversity in terms of external morphology. Parallel venation in a monocot leaf Reticulate venation in a dicot leaf Stomata Stomata are pores found in the epidermis of leaves that facilitate gas exchangei.

Difference between monocot and dicot stem

The leaf venation is also parallel, the roots are the adventitious type, and they are herbaceous containing soft stems. These studies will be helpful to know about the plants and their varieties in a much better way. Stem vascular bundles in a ring Roots are adventitious Secondary growth absent Secondary growth often present Number of cotyledons -- The number of cotyledons found in the embryo is the actual basis for distinguishing the two classes of angiosperms, and is the source of the names Monocotyledonae "one cotyledon" and Dicotyledonae "two cotyledons". The cotyledons are the "seed leaves" produced by the embryo. Some of the more persistent perigones demonstrate thermonastic opening and closing responsive to changes in temperature. As with the number of floral parts, this character is not always reliable, as there are many monocots with reticulate venation, notably the aroids and Dioscoreales. Examples of Monocots and Dicots There are about 65, species of monocots. The production of fragrances for olfactory signalling are common in monocots. Corms are short lived vertical shoots with terminal inflorescences and shrivel once flowering has occurred. In contrast, dicots have a taproot system , a tapering root that grows downward and has other roots sprouting laterally from it. As these are herbaceous as well as woody, so the stem shows secondary growth and produce woods.

The vascular system is scattered in monocots, with no particular arrangement. Dicots do not have bulliform cells in their leaves. Rhizomes frequently have an additional storage function and rhizome producing plants are considered geophytes Tillich, Figure The flower parts are present in multiples of three in the monocotyledons, even the secondary growth and cambium is absent, but in dicots, the flower parts are present in multiples of four or five, even secondary growth and cambium is present.

structure of monocot and dicot seed

Some species belonging to monocots can have characters belonging to dicots, since the two groups have a shared ancestry.

From these, considerable diversity arises.

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Monocots and Dicots